mcnallyperiodicals:

"American prosperity was built on two and a half centuries of slavery, a deep wound that has never been healed or fully atoned for – and that has been deepened by years of discrimination, segregation, and racist housing policies that persist to his day. Until America reckons with the moral debt it has accrued – to generations of black Americans, it will fail to live up to its own ideals."

Go on, Mr. Ta-nehisi Coates, preach. THE CASE FOR REPARATIONS. Go on with your bad self.

A lot of praise going around for this and I look forward to reading it this weekend.
UPDATE: Yep, it’s fantastic.

In the 20th century, the cause of reparations was taken up by a diverse cast that included the Confederate veteran Walter R. Vaughan, who believed that reparations would be a stimulus for the South; the black activist Callie House; black-nationalist leaders like “Queen Mother” Audley Moore; and the civil-rights activist James Forman. The movement coalesced in 1987 under an umbrella organization called the National Coalition of Blacks for Reparations in America (N’COBRA). The NAACP endorsed reparations in 1993. Charles J. Ogletree Jr., a professor at Harvard Law School, has pursued reparations claims in court.
But while the people advocating reparations have changed over time, the response from the country has remained virtually the same. “They have been taught to labor,” the Chicago Tribune editorialized in 1891. “They have been taught Christian civilization, and to speak the noble English language instead of some African gibberish. The account is square with the ex‑slaves.”
Not exactly. Having been enslaved for 250 years, black people were not left to their own devices. They were terrorized. In the Deep South, a second slavery ruled. In the North, legislatures, mayors, civic associations, banks, and citizens all colluded to pin black people into ghettos, where they were overcrowded, overcharged, and undereducated. Businesses discriminated against them, awarding them the worst jobs and the worst wages. Police brutalized them in the streets. And the notion that black lives, black bodies, and black wealth were rightful targets remained deeply rooted in the broader society. Now we have half-stepped away from our long centuries of despoilment, promising, “Never again.” But still we are haunted. It is as though we have run up a credit-card bill and, having pledged to charge no more, remain befuddled that the balance does not disappear. The effects of that balance, interest accruing daily, are all around us.

Also see NPR’s “How To Tell Who Hasn’t Read The New ‘Atlantic’ Cover Story.”

mcnallyperiodicals:

"American prosperity was built on two and a half centuries of slavery, a deep wound that has never been healed or fully atoned for – and that has been deepened by years of discrimination, segregation, and racist housing policies that persist to his day. Until America reckons with the moral debt it has accrued – to generations of black Americans, it will fail to live up to its own ideals."

Go on, Mr. Ta-nehisi Coates, preach. THE CASE FOR REPARATIONS. Go on with your bad self.

A lot of praise going around for this and I look forward to reading it this weekend.

UPDATE: Yep, it’s fantastic.

In the 20th century, the cause of reparations was taken up by a diverse cast that included the Confederate veteran Walter R. Vaughan, who believed that reparations would be a stimulus for the South; the black activist Callie House; black-nationalist leaders like “Queen Mother” Audley Moore; and the civil-rights activist James Forman. The movement coalesced in 1987 under an umbrella organization called the National Coalition of Blacks for Reparations in America (N’COBRA). The NAACP endorsed reparations in 1993. Charles J. Ogletree Jr., a professor at Harvard Law School, has pursued reparations claims in court.

But while the people advocating reparations have changed over time, the response from the country has remained virtually the same. “They have been taught to labor,” the Chicago Tribune editorialized in 1891. “They have been taught Christian civilization, and to speak the noble English language instead of some African gibberish. The account is square with the ex‑slaves.”

Not exactly. Having been enslaved for 250 years, black people were not left to their own devices. They were terrorized. In the Deep South, a second slavery ruled. In the North, legislatures, mayors, civic associations, banks, and citizens all colluded to pin black people into ghettos, where they were overcrowded, overcharged, and undereducated. Businesses discriminated against them, awarding them the worst jobs and the worst wages. Police brutalized them in the streets. And the notion that black lives, black bodies, and black wealth were rightful targets remained deeply rooted in the broader society. Now we have half-stepped away from our long centuries of despoilment, promising, “Never again.” But still we are haunted. It is as though we have run up a credit-card bill and, having pledged to charge no more, remain befuddled that the balance does not disappear. The effects of that balance, interest accruing daily, are all around us.

Also see NPR’s “How To Tell Who Hasn’t Read The New ‘Atlantic’ Cover Story.”

R.I.P.

It won’t ever be the same. #Blackhawks pic.twitter.com/Weh98OZ3ne
— Chris Kuc (@ChrisKuc)
March 25, 2014

R.I.P.

Just as we were gearing up for tonight’s debut of top prospect Teuvo Teravainen, Blackhawks fans have been blindsided by very sad news about the death of longtime Daily Herald beat writer Tim Sassone:

It is with deep regret and sadness that we share the news that one of our longtime colleagues, Tim Sassone, passed away this morning after an extended illness. Tim was a fighter to the very end. He battled back from a stroke in 2012 to resume his full-time duties later that year after a remarkable recovery before being hospitalized on Monday. Tim leaves behind his wife, Christine, and their two children, Ali and Andy. Tim was 58.
Tim joined the Daily Herald in 1984 and worked on the Sports Copy Desk before starting the Blackhawks beat in 1988. He was a finalist in this year’s Peter Lisagor contest for sports writing, and is a previous Lisagor winner. He was a Top 10 national finalist for game reporting in the APSE 2010 contest, and a key contributor in the sports section winning national honors from APSE seven times throughout his career. In 2007 he was nominated as a media finalist for Hockey Hall of Fame Award, and he was inducted into the Northern Star Hall of Fame in 2013. Last season, the Chicago Blackhawks honored him at a game by presenting him with a No. 25 jersey for his 25 years of covering the team.

Just as we were gearing up for tonight’s debut of top prospect Teuvo Teravainen, Blackhawks fans have been blindsided by very sad news about the death of longtime Daily Herald beat writer Tim Sassone:

It is with deep regret and sadness that we share the news that one of our longtime colleagues, Tim Sassone, passed away this morning after an extended illness. Tim was a fighter to the very end. He battled back from a stroke in 2012 to resume his full-time duties later that year after a remarkable recovery before being hospitalized on Monday. Tim leaves behind his wife, Christine, and their two children, Ali and Andy. Tim was 58.

Tim joined the Daily Herald in 1984 and worked on the Sports Copy Desk before starting the Blackhawks beat in 1988. He was a finalist in this year’s Peter Lisagor contest for sports writing, and is a previous Lisagor winner. He was a Top 10 national finalist for game reporting in the APSE 2010 contest, and a key contributor in the sports section winning national honors from APSE seven times throughout his career. In 2007 he was nominated as a media finalist for Hockey Hall of Fame Award, and he was inducted into the Northern Star Hall of Fame in 2013. Last season, the Chicago Blackhawks honored him at a game by presenting him with a No. 25 jersey for his 25 years of covering the team.

See, all we need to do to save the newspaper industry is reprint old editions and mark them up 80 percent from the original newsstand price.

See, all we need to do to save the newspaper industry is reprint old editions and mark them up 80 percent from the original newsstand price.

“I’ve spent a lifetime humbly working to learn, to preserve, to teach and to help us to remember who we are as a distinct people. … So you can imagine my dismay when I saw my name and words used to defend the racist Washington Redskins name. My son-in-law, ESPN’s Rick Reilly, completely misunderstood the conversation we had, quoting me as saying ‘the whole issue is so silly. The name just doesn’t bother me much. It’s an issue that shouldn’t be an issue, not with all the problems we’ve got in this country.’ … But that’s not what I said. … What I actually said is that ‘it’s silly in this day and age that this should even be a battle — if the name offends someone, change it.’ He failed to include my comments that the term ‘redskins’ demeans Indians, andhistorically is insulting and offensive, and that I firmly believe the Washington Redskins should change their name. … When Rick’s article came out, it upset me to be portrayed as an ‘Uncle Tom’ in support of this racial slur. I asked him to correct the record. He has not, so I must do it myself.”
Bob Burns, father-in-law to Redskins apologist Rick Reilly. As Deadspin’s Barry Petchesky correctly notes, “Twisting quotes to make a person express the exact opposite of what they said is, at many outlets, a fireable offense.” You’re on the clock, Mother Ship.
“My concern is that the very existence of this kind of capability chills free speech in a disastrous way. I cannot see how there can be investigative reporting of the national security community, when the identity, the location, the metadata, and really the contents of every communication between a journalist and every source, every journalist, every source, is known to the executive branch, especially one that has been prosecuting twice as many journalist — sources as any president before. … Moreover, my even larger concern is, I don’t see how democracy can survive when one branch, the executive branch, has all the personal communications of every member of Congress, and every judge, every member of the judiciary, as well as the press, the fourth estate that I have just been describing.”
Leak Investigations Are an Assault on the Press, and on Democracy, Too:

This was supposed to be the administration of unprecedented transparency. President Obama promised that when he took office, and the White House’s Web site says so on this very day. It reads:
My administration is committed to creating an unprecedented level of openness in government. We will work together to ensure the public trust and establish a system of transparency, public participation, and collaboration. Openness will strengthen our democracy and promote efficiency and effectiveness in government.
Government should be transparent. Transparency promotes accountability and provides information for citizens about what their government is doing.
Instead, it’s turning out to be the administration of unprecedented secrecy and of unprecedented attacks on a free press.

Leak Investigations Are an Assault on the Press, and on Democracy, Too:

This was supposed to be the administration of unprecedented transparency. President Obama promised that when he took office, and the White House’s Web site says so on this very day. It reads:

My administration is committed to creating an unprecedented level of openness in government. We will work together to ensure the public trust and establish a system of transparency, public participation, and collaboration. Openness will strengthen our democracy and promote efficiency and effectiveness in government.

Government should be transparent. Transparency promotes accountability and provides information for citizens about what their government is doing.

Instead, it’s turning out to be the administration of unprecedented secrecy and of unprecedented attacks on a free press.

Chicago Tribune:

Comcast SportsNet Chicago reporter Susannah Collins, part of the broadcast team covering the Chicago Blackhawks, is no longer with the network as of Thursday night, after two days of internet attention over a flubbed sentence on live television led to revelations about previous, more controversial sports show appearances."Due to circumstances unrelated to her on-air remarks Tuesday night, Susannah Collins and Comcast SportsNet Chicago have parted ways," Phil Bedella, vice president and general manager of CSN Chicago said in a statement. "We appreciate everything Susannah has contributed to our network over the past year and wish her the best in her future endeavors."
On Tuesday, Collins  inadvertently said that the Blackhawks had a “tremendous amount of sex during the regular season.” The mistake went viral, landing everywhere from news web sites to the Tonight Show monologue, where it was highlighted Wednesday as the “Freudian Slip of the Day” by host Jay Leno.

Bullshit. As Deadspin notes about those supposed “revelations”:

That didn’t keep CSN from hiring Collins a few months ago, so to point toward “Sports Nutz” means the network didn’t do its due diligence. It brings us to conclude one of two things: either CSN doesn’t adequately investigate its job applicants (stupid), or its executives fire employees for an innocent misstatement (tremendously stupid). Collins was open about her “Sports Nutz” involvement and how they boosted her career; we actually covered “Sports Nutz” here at Deadspin back in the day.
It’s unclear who will cover for Collins’s departure for the rest of the Stanley Cup playoffs. Let’s not forget that CSN reporter Kendall Gill tried to physically assault a colleague and was only suspended, not fired.

Hopefully she will still be welcome at the imminent Blackhawks Stanley Cup victory parade in June—without having to deal with Jim Belushi.

Chicago Tribune:

Comcast SportsNet Chicago reporter Susannah Collins, part of the broadcast team covering the Chicago Blackhawks, is no longer with the network as of Thursday night, after two days of internet attention over a flubbed sentence on live television led to revelations about previous, more controversial sports show appearances.

"Due to circumstances unrelated to her on-air remarks Tuesday night, Susannah Collins and Comcast SportsNet Chicago have parted ways," Phil Bedella, vice president and general manager of CSN Chicago said in a statement. "We appreciate everything Susannah has contributed to our network over the past year and wish her the best in her future endeavors."

On Tuesday, Collins  inadvertently said that the Blackhawks had a “tremendous amount of sex during the regular season.” The mistake went viral, landing everywhere from news web sites to the Tonight Show monologue, where it was highlighted Wednesday as the “Freudian Slip of the Day” by host Jay Leno.

Bullshit. As Deadspin notes about those supposed “revelations”:

That didn’t keep CSN from hiring Collins a few months ago, so to point toward “Sports Nutz” means the network didn’t do its due diligence. It brings us to conclude one of two things: either CSN doesn’t adequately investigate its job applicants (stupid), or its executives fire employees for an innocent misstatement (tremendously stupid). Collins was open about her “Sports Nutz” involvement and how they boosted her career; we actually covered “Sports Nutz” here at Deadspin back in the day.

It’s unclear who will cover for Collins’s departure for the rest of the Stanley Cup playoffs. Let’s not forget that CSN reporter Kendall Gill tried to physically assault a colleague and was only suspended, not fired.

Hopefully she will still be welcome at the imminent Blackhawks Stanley Cup victory parade in June—without having to deal with Jim Belushi.

Al Gore, Al Jazeera, al-Qaeda … they’re all the same to the folks over at Fox News:

Fox does not report on rumours that its owner Rupert Murdoch and his Saudi partner Prince Walid visited Al Jazeera and reportedly were interested in buying the channel, or that Al Jazeera frequently exposed bogus pro-US military propaganda that Fox carried as news during the Iraq War.
…
But Fox News has a habit of not letting facts get in the way of its coverage, reporting that many Americans “feel” it’s a terrorist network perhaps because Al Jazeera to them, idiotically, sounds like al-Qaeda (and because this “feeling” is always being reinforced by bombastic pundits who are scoring political points, not making factual statements). There is no evidence to support this claim. 
Fox reports:
Al Jazeera has been criticised for having a pro-Islamist bent, and accused of working with members of al-Qaeda. One of its journalists was arrested in Israel in 2011 on suspicion of being an agent of the Palestinian group Hamas.
(That was Samer Allawi, their Kabul bureau chief, who was later released, a fact Fox ignores when Israeli suspicions proved groundless.) 
Fox’s “report” goes on: 
Dave Marash, a former “Nightline” reporter who worked for Al Jazeera in Washington, said he left the network in 2008 in part because he sensed an anti-American bias there.
As it turns out, I spoke with Marash (who I worked alongside at ABC News) about why he left and he said it had more to do with his wanting to report with his wife from the field and not be stuck in an anchor chair. 
Last year, the media website Newser reported that Marash still respects Al Jazeera, the opposite of what the Fox article insinuates. 
He is quoted as saying:
The product is too good, too significant, to not have a market in the US, given the complete abdication of American networks and cable channels from actually covering international news.
… The current situation is “tragic”, in his view. It plays into the ignorance of American viewers, most of whom are clueless as to what the world thinks and why. It’s very harmful to America’s effectiveness and stature in the world.
So once again, Fox’s smears and aversion to the truth misrepresents the situation. 

Al Gore, Al Jazeera, al-Qaeda … they’re all the same to the folks over at Fox News:

Fox does not report on rumours that its owner Rupert Murdoch and his Saudi partner Prince Walid visited Al Jazeera and reportedly were interested in buying the channel, or that Al Jazeera frequently exposed bogus pro-US military propaganda that Fox carried as news during the Iraq War.

But Fox News has a habit of not letting facts get in the way of its coverage, reporting that many Americans “feel” it’s a terrorist network perhaps because Al Jazeera to them, idiotically, sounds like al-Qaeda (and because this “feeling” is always being reinforced by bombastic pundits who are scoring political points, not making factual statements). There is no evidence to support this claim. 

Fox reports:

Al Jazeera has been criticised for having a pro-Islamist bent, and accused of working with members of al-Qaeda. One of its journalists was arrested in Israel in 2011 on suspicion of being an agent of the Palestinian group Hamas.

(That was Samer Allawi, their Kabul bureau chief, who was later released, a fact Fox ignores when Israeli suspicions proved groundless.) 

Fox’s “report” goes on: 

Dave Marash, a former “Nightline” reporter who worked for Al Jazeera in Washington, said he left the network in 2008 in part because he sensed an anti-American bias there.

As it turns out, I spoke with Marash (who I worked alongside at ABC News) about why he left and he said it had more to do with his wanting to report with his wife from the field and not be stuck in an anchor chair. 

Last year, the media website Newser reported that Marash still respects Al Jazeera, the opposite of what the Fox article insinuates. 

He is quoted as saying:

The product is too good, too significant, to not have a market in the US, given the complete abdication of American networks and cable channels from actually covering international news.

… The current situation is “tragic”, in his view. It plays into the ignorance of American viewers, most of whom are clueless as to what the world thinks and why. It’s very harmful to America’s effectiveness and stature in the world.

So once again, Fox’s smears and aversion to the truth misrepresents the situation. 

FOX19.com-Cincinnati News, Weather

Cincinnati’s WXIX-TV reporter Ben Swann makes the most of his five minutes with President Obama, asking “How do you justify having a kill list?

Here’s Mitt Romney addressing the issue during a debate earlier this year, demonstrating the usual shifting position that isn’t any more encouraging:

After the killing of AnWar al-Awlaki last September, Gary Johnson said:

“Let there be no doubt. We have to be vigilant, we have to protect the U.S. and U. S. citizens from terrorist attacks, and we have to aggressively pursue those who would do us harm. At the same time we cannot allow the War on Terror to diminish our steadfast adherence to the notion of due process for American citizens. The protections under the Constitution for those accused of crimes do not just apply to people we like — they apply to everyone, including a terrorist like al-Awlaki. It is a question of due process for American citizens.”

I did not see a statement from Jill Stein on the issue. stand corrected about Jill Stein’s stance:

  • Repeal the unconstitutional provisions of the National Defense Authorization Act that gives the president the power to indefinitely imprison and even assassinate American citizens without due process.
Not surprising to get these faces when right-wing Washington Post blogger Jennifer Rubin is talking about basic journalism concepts like, you know, “accuracy.” When discussing the way the fact-checkers (rightfully) “went after” Paul Ryan’s speech at the Republican National Convention on today’s “Reliable Sources,” Rubin actually said:

"I think the entire industry of fact-checkers needs to be rethought. First of all, they don’t deal in facts, and secondly, they don’t check very well."

That’s a pretty astonishing statement from Rubin, in particular, since she has routinely relied on WaPo’s own fact-checker.
Consider this piece she wrote in July:

Virtually all of the ads were viciously negative, and judging from the number of Pinocchios they’ve racked up, continually and materially false.

Or a month before that:

My colleague Glenn Kessler demolishes Bain Attack 2.0, delivering four Pinocchios. It is essential to read Glenn’s post in full to appreciate how inaccurate is the “outsourcing” ad, but I’ll share just a couple snippets.

And a month before that:

Increasingly the White House spin machine is getting Pinocchioed.

So on, so forth.

Not surprising to get these faces when right-wing Washington Post blogger Jennifer Rubin is talking about basic journalism concepts like, you know, “accuracy.” When discussing the way the fact-checkers (rightfully) “went after” Paul Ryan’s speech at the Republican National Convention on today’s “Reliable Sources,” Rubin actually said:

"I think the entire industry of fact-checkers needs to be rethought. First of all, they don’t deal in facts, and secondly, they don’t check very well."

That’s a pretty astonishing statement from Rubin, in particular, since she has routinely relied on WaPo’s own fact-checker.

Consider this piece she wrote in July:

Virtually all of the ads were viciously negative, and judging from the number of Pinocchios they’ve racked up, continually and materially false.

Or a month before that:

My colleague Glenn Kessler demolishes Bain Attack 2.0, delivering four Pinocchios. It is essential to read Glenn’s post in full to appreciate how inaccurate is the “outsourcing” ad, but I’ll share just a couple snippets.

And a month before that:

Increasingly the White House spin machine is getting Pinocchioed.

So on, so forth.

Former reporter, managing editor and chairman of the board for the Associated Press as well as Dallas Morning News publisher, Burl Osborne has died at the age of 75:

Mr. Osborne said he learned the power of the press while covering the story of a hound dog trapped in a mine shaft buried under half a mountain. The dog had fallen into the open shaft and was being kept alive by its owner, a boy who threw food to the trapped animal. 

The dog had been in the shaft for about a month when Mr. Osborne started covering the story for the AP in November 1961. The cub reporter captured the nation’s attention with his reports on the hound’s plight. 

As Christmas drew near, Mr. Osborne was told he wasn’t leaving Bluefield until the dog was out of the shaft.  

“That suggested the next day’s lead on how to get the dog out,” Mr. Osborne recalled in 1980. “I wrote a story saying that unless this boy got the services of a bulldozer, his dog wasn’t going to be home for Christmas.” 

The next morning, six or eight bulldozers were moving the mountain to get to the hound — the solution he had suggested. 

“It was then that I began to understand the power of the newspaper story,” Mr. Osborne said.

Former reporter, managing editor and chairman of the board for the Associated Press as well as Dallas Morning News publisher, Burl Osborne has died at the age of 75:

Mr. Osborne said he learned the power of the press while covering the story of a hound dog trapped in a mine shaft buried under half a mountain. The dog had fallen into the open shaft and was being kept alive by its owner, a boy who threw food to the trapped animal.

The dog had been in the shaft for about a month when Mr. Osborne started covering the story for the AP in November 1961. The cub reporter captured the nation’s attention with his reports on the hound’s plight.
As Christmas drew near, Mr. Osborne was told he wasn’t leaving Bluefield until the dog was out of the shaft.

“That suggested the next day’s lead on how to get the dog out,” Mr. Osborne recalled in 1980. “I wrote a story saying that unless this boy got the services of a bulldozer, his dog wasn’t going to be home for Christmas.”
The next morning, six or eight bulldozers were moving the mountain to get to the hound — the solution he had suggested.

“It was then that I began to understand the power of the newspaper story,” Mr. Osborne said.
Sara Ganim, the 24-year-old Patriot News reporter who broke the story that a grand jury was investigating Penn State Assistant Football Coach Jerry Sandusky for sexual abuse allegations, has won a richly deserved 2012 Pulitzer Prize for local reporting. 

Sara Ganim, the 24-year-old Patriot News reporter who broke the story that a grand jury was investigating Penn State Assistant Football Coach Jerry Sandusky for sexual abuse allegations, has won a richly deserved 2012 Pulitzer Prize for local reporting

In regards to ESPN’s justification for basically waiting eight years to expose a child molester:

From a professional standpoint our role as a journalist is to seek out information and vet that information and when we’re satisfied with the credibility of that information to report it to the public. It’s what journalists do. It’s not necessarily the journalist’s role to go to the police with potential evidence that at the time we didn’t believe was strong enough to report ourselves.
We also were aware at that time that Bobby Davis had gone to the Syracuse Police in 2002 and told them about these allegations and he had been told by them that the statute of limitations had expired. So we were fully under the impression that the police had been made aware of the story and had decided not to pursue it.
All journalists could be asking themselves this very same question: What role should journalists play in providing information that may or may not have been reported? It’s complex and something we must continue to evaluate.

ESPN has thoughts on journalism? Since when? And why now? 
Wasn’t this guy helping broadcast coverage of the Penn State game this past weekend? The very idea of an ethical code at the Entertainment and Sports Programming Network would be laughable if it didn’t involve downplaying the molestation of children in favor of preserving some jackass coach’s “legacy.”

In regards to ESPN’s justification for basically waiting eight years to expose a child molester:

From a professional standpoint our role as a journalist is to seek out information and vet that information and when we’re satisfied with the credibility of that information to report it to the public. It’s what journalists do. It’s not necessarily the journalist’s role to go to the police with potential evidence that at the time we didn’t believe was strong enough to report ourselves.

We also were aware at that time that Bobby Davis had gone to the Syracuse Police in 2002 and told them about these allegations and he had been told by them that the statute of limitations had expired. So we were fully under the impression that the police had been made aware of the story and had decided not to pursue it.

All journalists could be asking themselves this very same question: What role should journalists play in providing information that may or may not have been reported? It’s complex and something we must continue to evaluate.

ESPN has thoughts on journalism? Since when? And why now? 

Wasn’t this guy helping broadcast coverage of the Penn State game this past weekend? The very idea of an ethical code at the Entertainment and Sports Programming Network would be laughable if it didn’t involve downplaying the molestation of children in favor of preserving some jackass coach’s “legacy.”

“In this world, it is perfectly fine to say that a president is inept or even somewhat corrupt. A titillating, tawdry sex scandal, such as the Bill Clinton brouhaha, can be fun, even desirable as a way of keeping entertainment levels high. Such revelations are all just part of the political cycle. But to acknowledge that our highest political officials are felons (which is what people are, by definition, who break our laws) or war criminals (which is what people are, by definition, who violate the laws of war) is to threaten the system of power, and that is unthinkable. Above all else, media figures are desperate to maintain the current power structure, as it is their role within it that provides them with prominence, wealth, and self-esteem. Their prime mandate then becomes protecting and defending Washington, which means attacking anyone who would dare suggest that the government has been criminal at its core.”