scorpiondagger:

- here’s my ‘life of christ’ in 10 gifs - 

i left out the other two i made, so that i could make this little, tumblr-friendly packet. enjoy. 

Not sure whether this is more Easter or 4/20-related.

St. Louis always brings out the best in people.

St. Louis always brings out the best in people.

couturewriter:

excitablehonky:

Dan Wetzel writes that “Jameis Winston deserves benefit of doubt in sexual assault claim until proven otherwise”:

Perhaps the police didn’t act because they quickly deemed the allegation baseless or found the accuser/victim to be non-credible. The police report lists the accused as standing between 5-foot-9 and 5-foot-11. Winston is 6-foot-4. Of course, police reports are historically riddled with errors.
Also for what’s it worth, Winston’s attorney told the Tallahassee Democrat he’s provided law enforcement with two affidavits from witnesses present that night that defend Winston. Did Winston also provide a written account of the night and that was enough for the police to not seek questioning?
Perhaps the investigation stalled because the complainant didn’t want to cooperate, although the TPD told the Tallahassee Democrat she is working with the state attorney.
Or perhaps, as some are certainly prone to believe, a college town police department swept this under the rug. At this stage, however, that isn’t just baseless speculation but wild, unfair stereotyping. 
The assumption requires the belief that numerous officers and departments (including the one assigned to investigate sexual assaults) chose to risk their careers, reputations and perhaps their own freedom to protect a then-redshirt quarterback for the local football team.
That isn’t just improbable and would require a vast cover-up; it’s without even a hint of evidence suggesting as much.
What’s more believable, albeit with limited known facts, is that the police saw nothing to investigate. That may not mean the woman is lying. It may mean there just isn’t evidence. Although, again, if this were a close call, you’d think the police would have at least spoken to Winston.
…
It’s long past time for sexual assaults, particularly acquaintance rapes, to end in America. They are a terrible plague against women. They are overwhelmingly preventable. There should be zero tolerance.
That said, there also must be a fair system for the accused. Even the most ardent activist against sexual assaults understands that. Without balance within the process, the entire movement collapses.
As sure as the complainant deserved a thorough and serious investigation into what she says happened in that apartment on that December morning, Jameis Winston deserves to be publicly cleared if, indeed, police long ago privately determined he did nothing wrong.


I get you guys are all FSU fans and to be honest, I don’t have much information about this actual case, but I’m going to point out a line here that I find problematic.

The assumption requires the belief that numerous officers and departments (including the one assigned to investigate sexual assaults) chose to risk their careers, reputations and perhaps their own freedom to protect a then-redshirt quarterback for the local football team.

What I find problematic about this statement is the assumption that police officers haven’t been covering up the crimes of athletes for years. Take a step back to Steubenville. It took media attention for them to even charge those boys with anything and there undeniable video proof on various social media sites. 
The truth of the matter is, when it comes to athletes in towns where that team is the be all and end all, police are risking their careers if they do speak out against the crime, or if they continue to pursue the investigation. Their reputation and career are put on the line if they even so much as question whether or not the victim is lying.
A lack of evidence is bullshit, especially on a case that has been open for 11 months. Keep in mind that even the FBI agree that only 2% of cases are unfounded, and that most are solid in their accusations.
Being an athlete shouldn’t protect you from anything, and this is one of the biggest things that bugs me about sport worship, especially in the United States. If you’re even in a position where you can be accused of sexual assault, if you put someone else in a position where they could feel uncomfortable enough with your sexual advances that it’s deemed sexual assault, you shouldn’t get to be the starting quarterback of a D1 team.

I thought about this reblog either while I was reading or shortly after I finished reading the completely damning story from the New York Times about the Tallahassee Police Department and Florida State University’s (or severe lack of) investigation into the rape accusations against Winston. I probably should have known better, considering what we learned about how wrongdoing by important college figures was handled during the Jerry Sandusky revelations some three years ago. That connection could not have been more apparent when I came across this part of the Times story:

Patricia A. Carroll, a lawyer for Mr. Winston’s accuser, said the police investigator who handled the case, Scott Angulo, told her that because Tallahassee was a big football town, her client would be “raked over the coals” if she pursued the case.
Officer Angulo has done private security work for the Seminole Boosters, a nonprofit organization, with nearly $150 million in assets, that is the primary financier of Florida State athletics, according to records and a lawyer for the boosters. It also paid roughly a quarter of the $602,000 salary of the university president, Eric Barron, who was recently named president of Penn State.

While I generally consider Dan Wetzel to be one of the best and most thoughtful sportswriters working today, his initial reaction to the Times story (keep in mind that he began his career as a police and courts reporter) struck me as being uncharacteristically naive:

Brutal NYT investigation into investigation of Jameis Winston http://t.co/9cAf7PDvfw Not sure it was football favoritism. Just terrible cops
— Dan Wetzel (@DanWetzel)
April 16, 2014

couturewriter:

excitablehonky:

Dan Wetzel writes that “Jameis Winston deserves benefit of doubt in sexual assault claim until proven otherwise”:

Perhaps the police didn’t act because they quickly deemed the allegation baseless or found the accuser/victim to be non-credible. The police report lists the accused as standing between 5-foot-9 and 5-foot-11. Winston is 6-foot-4. Of course, police reports are historically riddled with errors.

Also for what’s it worth, Winston’s attorney told the Tallahassee Democrat he’s provided law enforcement with two affidavits from witnesses present that night that defend Winston. Did Winston also provide a written account of the night and that was enough for the police to not seek questioning?

Perhaps the investigation stalled because the complainant didn’t want to cooperate, although the TPD told the Tallahassee Democrat she is working with the state attorney.

Or perhaps, as some are certainly prone to believe, a college town police department swept this under the rug. At this stage, however, that isn’t just baseless speculation but wild, unfair stereotyping. 

The assumption requires the belief that numerous officers and departments (including the one assigned to investigate sexual assaults) chose to risk their careers, reputations and perhaps their own freedom to protect a then-redshirt quarterback for the local football team.

That isn’t just improbable and would require a vast cover-up; it’s without even a hint of evidence suggesting as much.

What’s more believable, albeit with limited known facts, is that the police saw nothing to investigate. That may not mean the woman is lying. It may mean there just isn’t evidence. Although, again, if this were a close call, you’d think the police would have at least spoken to Winston.

It’s long past time for sexual assaults, particularly acquaintance rapes, to end in America. They are a terrible plague against women. They are overwhelmingly preventable. There should be zero tolerance.

That said, there also must be a fair system for the accused. Even the most ardent activist against sexual assaults understands that. Without balance within the process, the entire movement collapses.

As sure as the complainant deserved a thorough and serious investigation into what she says happened in that apartment on that December morning, Jameis Winston deserves to be publicly cleared if, indeed, police long ago privately determined he did nothing wrong.

I get you guys are all FSU fans and to be honest, I don’t have much information about this actual case, but I’m going to point out a line here that I find problematic.

The assumption requires the belief that numerous officers and departments (including the one assigned to investigate sexual assaults) chose to risk their careers, reputations and perhaps their own freedom to protect a then-redshirt quarterback for the local football team.

What I find problematic about this statement is the assumption that police officers haven’t been covering up the crimes of athletes for years. Take a step back to Steubenville. It took media attention for them to even charge those boys with anything and there undeniable video proof on various social media sites. 

The truth of the matter is, when it comes to athletes in towns where that team is the be all and end all, police are risking their careers if they do speak out against the crime, or if they continue to pursue the investigation. Their reputation and career are put on the line if they even so much as question whether or not the victim is lying.

A lack of evidence is bullshit, especially on a case that has been open for 11 months. Keep in mind that even the FBI agree that only 2% of cases are unfounded, and that most are solid in their accusations.

Being an athlete shouldn’t protect you from anything, and this is one of the biggest things that bugs me about sport worship, especially in the United States. If you’re even in a position where you can be accused of sexual assault, if you put someone else in a position where they could feel uncomfortable enough with your sexual advances that it’s deemed sexual assault, you shouldn’t get to be the starting quarterback of a D1 team.

I thought about this reblog either while I was reading or shortly after I finished reading the completely damning story from the New York Times about the Tallahassee Police Department and Florida State University’s (or severe lack of) investigation into the rape accusations against Winston. I probably should have known better, considering what we learned about how wrongdoing by important college figures was handled during the Jerry Sandusky revelations some three years ago. That connection could not have been more apparent when I came across this part of the Times story:

Patricia A. Carroll, a lawyer for Mr. Winston’s accuser, said the police investigator who handled the case, Scott Angulo, told her that because Tallahassee was a big football town, her client would be “raked over the coals” if she pursued the case.

Officer Angulo has done private security work for the Seminole Boosters, a nonprofit organization, with nearly $150 million in assets, that is the primary financier of Florida State athletics, according to records and a lawyer for the boosters. It also paid roughly a quarter of the $602,000 salary of the university president, Eric Barron, who was recently named president of Penn State.

While I generally consider Dan Wetzel to be one of the best and most thoughtful sportswriters working today, his initial reaction to the Times story (keep in mind that he began his career as a police and courts reporter) struck me as being uncharacteristically naive:

#BecauseItsTheCup

#BecauseItsTheCup

The return of debtors’ prisons has been discussed in the New York Times, The Atlantic, and The Nation, but this segment from this past weekend’s NewsHour was another particularly heartbreaking example of the callous nature of private probation services:

… these private debt collectors are by definition in business to make money. And even though they don’t charge the city anything, they charge offenders, like Timothy Fugatt, $45 a month plus a $10 start-up fee, until a debt is fully paid off. This on top of the $500 in court costs that Fugatt already owed.

JOHN CARLOS FREY: Can you tell me if you were making an effort to pay these off?

TIM FUGATT: We were. Yes, Sir. Even though, you know, I was makin’ the effort, I wasn’t gettin’ very far with it. It was– it was till all these fees adding up. So I wasn’t gaining much ground.

Still, 4 months after their initial court date, documents show that the Fugatt’s scraped together enough to pay off almost $300 of the $500 they owed in court costs.

But then things went from bad to worse.. in June of 2011, their son, Cole, died. A month later their house that had been in the family for generations was foreclosed upon. At this point the Fugatts say they were consumed with grief and were missing their appointments with JCS. Timothy says he explained the difficult circumstances his family was under, but he says the JCS probation officer wouldn’t work with him at all.

TIM FUGATT: It was all at one time, just– just hit us all at once. And I explained it all to them. But we– you know, it was either pay or go to jail.

JOHN CARLOS FREY: Being threatened with a jail sentence, did that help you to come up with the money?

TIM FUGATT: It helped to try a little harder. But, you know, still. I mean, as the old saying goes, you know, you can’t squeeze blood from a turnip.

Over the next 8 months with JCS monthly fees adding up, the couple missed at least one court date each and were fined additional fees for failure to appear. Then a warrant for their arrest was issued. By the time of their arrest in February of 2012, the Fugatt’s had racked up $2,500 in additional court fines. Remember all this began with three traffic violations for which they were found not guilty.

Emphasis added.

image

think-progress:

This is the worst city in America to be homeless.
A must read.

Well this is revolting:


Beginning in the summer of 2013, Jim Kinnamon, a recently retired veteran who has lived in town for 60 years, decided he had had enough with the homeless population in Shawnee. Along with some others he knew in town, he organized a group known as “Shawnee Proud, Pott. County Strong” under the auspices of a citywide beautification campaign. In reality, the group began waging what one local TV station, KFOR, described as a “war on [the] homeless.”
By September, Kinnamon and his group had destroyed more than two dozen camps where homeless people slept. According to KFOR’s local news report, “They gave them three days to pack up and move out, and then leveled the area with a wood chipper.” The move, KFOR wrote, was part of an effort “to drive out the homeless population.”
One challenging aspect of being homeless is simply not having a place to store your stuff. Many people improvise, finding shrubs or other hiding spots to store possessions and food. But without a place of their own, their things often aren’t safe, either from burglars or just someone with a wood chipper.
Kinnamon defended the group’s actions as necessary. “We can’t continue to let them just ruin our downtown by using it as their restroom, we can’t do that,” he told KFOR. But the group’s antipathy for the homeless was laid bare on Kinnamon’s Facebook page. Comments ranged from accusing homeless people of faking it — “these people are not poor” — to comparing them unfavorably to Neanderthals — “cavemen lived better than this.these [sic] guys here are just too lazy to work and too stupid to steal.” Others weighed in as well. “Bums are just that, they leach off of kindness,” Melody Wood Gunter wrote. “Maybe we need signs in the park that read, ‘DO NOT FEED THE BARES,’” Jerry Duff offered before calling on officials to ticket and tow a charity group that was feeding the homeless for not having a permit. One woman even complained that if a homeless person freezes to death, “we as tax payers have to pay to bury them. Plus it makes a town or city look bad for not doing enough, when one of these bums die.”
ThinkProgress spoke with Kinnamon by phone about whether it was true that he and others in the group were out searching for and destroying homeless people’s possessions. He didn’t deny that the group had razed as many as 50 camps with a wood chipper, but according to him, most of them weren’t in use. They “had molded mattresses, the tents were falling down, nobody was occupying them,” he claimed, despite the fact that disrepair is not a sure sign of abandonment. He conceded that the group had destroyed two camps that they knew were occupied, but justified the move by noting that the campers were given advance notice and allowed to take what they wanted before the group got rid of whatever was left.
It wouldn’t exactly be right to call Shawnee Proud a vigilante group. That’s because their operations weren’t just ignored by city officials, nor were they simply condoned. They were actively celebrated.

On multiple occasions in the fall of 2013, city officials met with Kinnamon and Shawnee Proud to discuss their efforts. On December 20, Kinnamon proudly posted a thank-you note he’d received from the mayor. “The mayor is behind everything we do and all of our efforts,” he told ThinkProgress. Until recently, a glowing video featuring him was on the Shawnee government’s homepage.

think-progress:

This is the worst city in America to be homeless.

A must read.

Well this is revolting:

Beginning in the summer of 2013, Jim Kinnamon, a recently retired veteran who has lived in town for 60 years, decided he had had enough with the homeless population in Shawnee. Along with some others he knew in town, he organized a group known as “Shawnee Proud, Pott. County Strong” under the auspices of a citywide beautification campaign. In reality, the group began waging what one local TV station, KFOR, described as a “war on [the] homeless.”

By September, Kinnamon and his group had destroyed more than two dozen camps where homeless people slept. According to KFOR’s local news report, “They gave them three days to pack up and move out, and then leveled the area with a wood chipper.” The move, KFOR wrote, was part of an effort “to drive out the homeless population.”

One challenging aspect of being homeless is simply not having a place to store your stuff. Many people improvise, finding shrubs or other hiding spots to store possessions and food. But without a place of their own, their things often aren’t safe, either from burglars or just someone with a wood chipper.

Kinnamon defended the group’s actions as necessary. “We can’t continue to let them just ruin our downtown by using it as their restroom, we can’t do that,” he told KFOR. But the group’s antipathy for the homeless was laid bare on Kinnamon’s Facebook page. Comments ranged from accusing homeless people of faking it — “these people are not poor” — to comparing them unfavorably to Neanderthals — “cavemen lived better than this.these [sic] guys here are just too lazy to work and too stupid to steal.” Others weighed in as well. “Bums are just that, they leach off of kindness,” Melody Wood Gunter wrote. “Maybe we need signs in the park that read, ‘DO NOT FEED THE BARES,’” Jerry Duff offered before calling on officials to ticket and tow a charity group that was feeding the homeless for not having a permit. One woman even complained that if a homeless person freezes to death, “we as tax payers have to pay to bury them. Plus it makes a town or city look bad for not doing enough, when one of these bums die.”

ThinkProgress spoke with Kinnamon by phone about whether it was true that he and others in the group were out searching for and destroying homeless people’s possessions. He didn’t deny that the group had razed as many as 50 camps with a wood chipper, but according to him, most of them weren’t in use. They “had molded mattresses, the tents were falling down, nobody was occupying them,” he claimed, despite the fact that disrepair is not a sure sign of abandonment. He conceded that the group had destroyed two camps that they knew were occupied, but justified the move by noting that the campers were given advance notice and allowed to take what they wanted before the group got rid of whatever was left.

It wouldn’t exactly be right to call Shawnee Proud a vigilante group. That’s because their operations weren’t just ignored by city officials, nor were they simply condoned. They were actively celebrated.

On multiple occasions in the fall of 2013, city officials met with Kinnamon and Shawnee Proud to discuss their efforts. On December 20, Kinnamon proudly posted a thank-you note he’d received from the mayor. “The mayor is behind everything we do and all of our efforts,” he told ThinkProgress. Until recently, a glowing video featuring him was on the Shawnee government’s homepage.

This might be the best thing you’ll see today:

Roy Sommer is the coach of the Worcester Sharks and the AHL record-holder for most regular-season games coached. He’s also a father of Marley Sommer, his oldest son who has both Downs Syndrome and autism.

‘Mo’, as he’s known, has become an indelible part of the Sharks’ locker room over the years. “He runs around this building; everyone knows Mo,” Roy Sommer told The Hockey News in March. “You see him walking around and how he interacts with everyone. For a guy who doesn’t say much, he says a lot.”

On Wednesday night, Marley was given a chance to sing the national anthem before the Sharks’ game against the Hartford Wolf Pack. The initial plan was to have him sing it on the bench with the team. But he saw the red carpet that was on the ice for the ceremonial puck drop and walked out to it – telling his father to return to the bench, and singing this unforgettable anthem[.]

atlantabraves:

40 years later and it’s still a moment we could watch again and again! 

The fence that ball cleared remains my favorite thing about the Ted, and I hope the city of Atlanta keeps it where it is when the Braves move to Cobb County in a few years. As Bob Nightengale put it today:

While Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in 1947 and Larry Doby became the first African American to play in the American League, Aaron’s feat might be the next most significant accomplishment in baseball’s role in the Civil Rights movement.

While numerous people today were arguing that Hammerin’ Hank should still be referred to as the “Home Run King,” I found myself largely agreeing with the points made by Joe Posnanski:

It was 40 years ago today that Aaron hit Homer No. 715, the one that passed Ruth, and so we are now getting that spate of stories and tweets about how Aaron — not Barry Bonds who hit more home runs — is the TRUE home run king. This is because Bonds used steroids. I must admit: This is one of my least favorite lines of sports conversation, and not just because of the steroid talk or the questionable mathematics involved. No, the big thing is that this suggests that Barry Bonds’ 756th home run in some odd way reduced the greatness of Henry Aaron. I did not — no more than John Unitas was reduced when Drew Brees broke his record or Jesse Owens is reduced every time someone run 100 meters faster than he did. Aaron’s career wasn’t the home run record. Aaron’s greatness had nothing to do with that number.
For that matter: Ruth’s greatness was not touched in any way when Henry Aaron hit 715.
This is an example of when numbers get in the way. We count things in sports because it adds meaning to the games. But those numbers do not sum up. If Tiger Woods somehow did win 19 majors — Jack Nicklaus said Tuesday he still believes Tiger will — that would not alter one thing about Nicklaus’ greatness, just like Jack’s amazing record did not change the wonderful golfing history of Bobby Jones.
Anyway, with Aaron, if you DO want to talk about numbers, home runs was never the right thing to count anyway. Several players through the year — Alex Rodriguez, Jimmie Foxx, Albert Pujols, Ken Griffey, Mickey Mantle, Sammy Sosa and Eddie Mathews — were all ahead of Aaron’s home run pace through age 32. Aaron aged better than any of them, and he finished his career in a home run park so good it was called “The Launching Pad” and he set the record.
But let’s just say this: Nobody’s breaking Henry Aaron’s total bases record. Nobody. Ever. Aaron’s 6,856 total bases is 700 more than second-place Stan Musial. Barry Bonds, for all those splash balls he hit into the water and all those MVP awards, still finished his career about NINE HUNDRED total bases shy of Henry Aaron. Alex Rodriguez would need more than 1,400 more total bases to get into the Henry Aaron stratosphere. That record is just about untouchable.
Henry Aaron’s 2,297 RBIs hasn’t been touched either — it’s 300 more RBIs than Bonds had.
There have been a lot of kings in sports. Arnold Palmer is called the King. Richard Petty is called the King. Hugh McElhenny was called the King, LeBron James is called the King. Pele is the King, Jerry Lawler is the King. In baseball we’ve had King Felix, King Carl, King Kelly, King Kong, and a shlep of a third baseman out of Villanova named Fred Lear who played during Deadball and was called King for obvious reasons. And of course Pete Rose is the Hit King, just like the people yell when they’re trying to get people to come into the store in Las Vegas and get an autograph.
We don’t need any more kings in the castle. Henry Aaron is not the Home Run King. Barry Bonds has the record. He will have the record for a long time. Cy Young has the most wins. Ty Cobb has the highest average. Rickey Henderson has the most stolen bases. Barry Bonds has the most home runs. Baseball would probably have to change pretty dramatically for any of those records to get broken anytime soon.
But Aaron’s legacy is not a record. His legacy is a near-perfect baseball career. It is hitting for average, hitting for power, running the bases, playing good defense … every day. It is not easy to be near your best every single day. Some would even say it’s impossible. We’re all just human beings. But it’s not impossible. Henry Aaron did it.

The night of April 8, 1974 deserves to be remembered for something larger than just the home run record.

atlantabraves:

40 years later and it’s still a moment we could watch again and again! 

The fence that ball cleared remains my favorite thing about the Ted, and I hope the city of Atlanta keeps it where it is when the Braves move to Cobb County in a few years. As Bob Nightengale put it today:

While Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in 1947 and Larry Doby became the first African American to play in the American League, Aaron’s feat might be the next most significant accomplishment in baseball’s role in the Civil Rights movement.

While numerous people today were arguing that Hammerin’ Hank should still be referred to as the “Home Run King,” I found myself largely agreeing with the points made by Joe Posnanski:

It was 40 years ago today that Aaron hit Homer No. 715, the one that passed Ruth, and so we are now getting that spate of stories and tweets about how Aaron — not Barry Bonds who hit more home runs — is the TRUE home run king. This is because Bonds used steroids. I must admit: This is one of my least favorite lines of sports conversation, and not just because of the steroid talk or the questionable mathematics involved. No, the big thing is that this suggests that Barry Bonds’ 756th home run in some odd way reduced the greatness of Henry Aaron. I did not — no more than John Unitas was reduced when Drew Brees broke his record or Jesse Owens is reduced every time someone run 100 meters faster than he did. Aaron’s career wasn’t the home run record. Aaron’s greatness had nothing to do with that number.

For that matter: Ruth’s greatness was not touched in any way when Henry Aaron hit 715.

This is an example of when numbers get in the way. We count things in sports because it adds meaning to the games. But those numbers do not sum up. If Tiger Woods somehow did win 19 majors — Jack Nicklaus said Tuesday he still believes Tiger will — that would not alter one thing about Nicklaus’ greatness, just like Jack’s amazing record did not change the wonderful golfing history of Bobby Jones.

Anyway, with Aaron, if you DO want to talk about numbers, home runs was never the right thing to count anyway. Several players through the year — Alex Rodriguez, Jimmie Foxx, Albert Pujols, Ken Griffey, Mickey Mantle, Sammy Sosa and Eddie Mathews — were all ahead of Aaron’s home run pace through age 32. Aaron aged better than any of them, and he finished his career in a home run park so good it was called “The Launching Pad” and he set the record.

But let’s just say this: Nobody’s breaking Henry Aaron’s total bases record. Nobody. Ever. Aaron’s 6,856 total bases is 700 more than second-place Stan Musial. Barry Bonds, for all those splash balls he hit into the water and all those MVP awards, still finished his career about NINE HUNDRED total bases shy of Henry Aaron. Alex Rodriguez would need more than 1,400 more total bases to get into the Henry Aaron stratosphere. That record is just about untouchable.

Henry Aaron’s 2,297 RBIs hasn’t been touched either — it’s 300 more RBIs than Bonds had.

There have been a lot of kings in sports. Arnold Palmer is called the King. Richard Petty is called the King. Hugh McElhenny was called the King, LeBron James is called the King. Pele is the King, Jerry Lawler is the King. In baseball we’ve had King Felix, King Carl, King Kelly, King Kong, and a shlep of a third baseman out of Villanova named Fred Lear who played during Deadball and was called King for obvious reasons. And of course Pete Rose is the Hit King, just like the people yell when they’re trying to get people to come into the store in Las Vegas and get an autograph.

We don’t need any more kings in the castle. Henry Aaron is not the Home Run King. Barry Bonds has the record. He will have the record for a long time. Cy Young has the most wins. Ty Cobb has the highest average. Rickey Henderson has the most stolen bases. Barry Bonds has the most home runs. Baseball would probably have to change pretty dramatically for any of those records to get broken anytime soon.

But Aaron’s legacy is not a record. His legacy is a near-perfect baseball career. It is hitting for average, hitting for power, running the bases, playing good defense … every day. It is not easy to be near your best every single day. Some would even say it’s impossible. We’re all just human beings. But it’s not impossible. Henry Aaron did it.

The night of April 8, 1974 deserves to be remembered for something larger than just the home run record.

devengreen:

Proving that the GOP truly is the party of the Lord, its healthcare policies are about to send more people to meet Jesus than murderers with guns! Glory!
- Courtesy of youtube.com/MrsBettyBowers




Congratulations on topping the list, Texas:

“Medicaid expansion is a misguided, and ultimately doomed, attempt to mask the shortcomings of Obamacare. It would benefit no one in our state to see their taxes skyrocket and our economy crushed as our budget crumbled under the weight of oppressive Medicaid costs,” Texas Gov. Rick Perry said at a press conference in March 2013.

…

… expanding Medicaid would produce additional revenue for hospital districts, potentially allowing county governments to cut their tax rate. In Bexar County, hospital district officials estimate that expanding Medicaid would save them $52 million a year, roughly 20 percent of the amount of revenue they get from the hospital district tax, and County Judge Nelson Wolff said he would cut property taxes to pass on the savings if it were approved. In Harris County, hospital district officials say the expansion of Medicaid would mean they would receive an additional $77.5 million in reimbursements, or roughly 15 percent of their tax revenue, based on 2013 financials.

devengreen:

Proving that the GOP truly is the party of the Lord, its healthcare policies are about to send more people to meet Jesus than murderers with guns! Glory!

- Courtesy of youtube.com/MrsBettyBowers

Congratulations on topping the list, Texas:

“Medicaid expansion is a misguided, and ultimately doomed, attempt to mask the shortcomings of Obamacare. It would benefit no one in our state to see their taxes skyrocket and our economy crushed as our budget crumbled under the weight of oppressive Medicaid costs,” Texas Gov. Rick Perry said at a press conference in March 2013.

… expanding Medicaid would produce additional revenue for hospital districts, potentially allowing county governments to cut their tax rate. In Bexar County, hospital district officials estimate that expanding Medicaid would save them $52 million a year, roughly 20 percent of the amount of revenue they get from the hospital district tax, and County Judge Nelson Wolff said he would cut property taxes to pass on the savings if it were approved. In Harris County, hospital district officials say the expansion of Medicaid would mean they would receive an additional $77.5 million in reimbursements, or roughly 15 percent of their tax revenue, based on 2013 financials.

Stuart Carlson
It looks like Chili’s had a pretty interesting weekend.
#TrueDetectiveSeason2

#TrueDetectiveSeason2

nedhepburn:

Who Should Replace David Letterman

I helped out on this list for Esquire (my picks are above). 

Any one of these four would be excellent.

mehmrmustard:

touchmeordont:

kohenari:


Last month, when Glenn Ford was released from prison for a crime he didn’t commit, the state of Louisiana “gave him a $20 debit card for his troubles.” That, plus the four cents he had left in his prison account, was all he had.
How do you build up the material accumulations of a lifetime overnight? How do you do it with no money? Where do you even begin?
Ford’s friend John Thompson had a clever idea: Do what millions of Americans do when they are hoping that other people will buy them a whole bunch of stuff. Build an Amazon registry.

The Amazon Wish List is here.
Read the whole piece here.

Just bought this dude something off his wishlist. You should too.

Boost this. Even if you don’t buy something yourself, someone who follows you might.


I’m OK with continuing to see this multiple times on my dash.

mehmrmustard:

touchmeordont:

kohenari:

Last month, when Glenn Ford was released from prison for a crime he didn’t commit, the state of Louisiana “gave him a $20 debit card for his troubles.” That, plus the four cents he had left in his prison account, was all he had.

How do you build up the material accumulations of a lifetime overnight? How do you do it with no money? Where do you even begin?

Ford’s friend John Thompson had a clever idea: Do what millions of Americans do when they are hoping that other people will buy them a whole bunch of stuff. Build an Amazon registry.

The Amazon Wish List is here.

Read the whole piece here.

Just bought this dude something off his wishlist. You should too.

Boost this. Even if you don’t buy something yourself, someone who follows you might.

I’m OK with continuing to see this multiple times on my dash.

Visual reminder that God is going to strike down Jerry Jones one of these days.

Visual reminder that God is going to strike down Jerry Jones one of these days.